New England Wildlife Center
Preserving New England's Wild Legacy
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
By: Greg Mertz, DVM
htqbb

This red-tailed hawk was hit on the right wing by a line drive golf ball. Fractured his ulna. Recovering after surgery.

By: NEWC Intern
Group Turkey small

This Thursday, we released three young turkeys that we have been caring for over the past month.  Turkeys are generally quite wary of people and do not have the best success rate at rehabilitation because they can become so stressed when they are in contact with people. These three will one day grow to be just under four feet tall, and while they live on the ground, they can be quite explosive flyers to get out of the reach of their predators. Turkeys eat both insects and plant matter when foraging on the ground. When we released our turkeys, two of them flew directly into the canopy, while this last one remained on the ground for a moment, just enough time to take a picture.

– Morgan Robinson, Student Intern

By: NEWC Intern
Swift small

Chimney Swifts

These Chimney Swifts came to us after falling down a chimney. Their name tells us where these guys live and nest. They like to climb up on the sides and hang vertically in huddles with their siblings. They’re not quite old enough to fly yet, though that doesn’t stop them from trying every chance they get. Swifts are really good fliers catching tiny insects in mid-flight. An interesting fact about them is that they can’t take off from the ground.

Elena Moser, Student Intern

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
RTH

This juvenile Red-tailed hawk was brought to us last June with permanent damage to its right wing and leg making it unable to fly.  Our trained staff, consisting of Stephanie, Marco and Sarah pictured below, have worked with the bird for 6 long months in order to make him comfortable interacting with humans and trained to sit on a gloved hand.  We are very proud of how well-trained and cooperative our hawk has become, and we are starting to incorporate him into more tours and public demonstrations.  Come by the New England Wildlife Center to say hi and get a chance to see a beautiful wild raptor up close!

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
ESO small

 

 

Spring and Summer are baby seasons at the New England Wildlife Center.  We receive an incredible diversity of orphaned native birds that require hand feedings every few minutes.  Our devoted interns provide the constant care, cleaning and love to raise these animals to a releasable age.  Pictured here are two nestling Eastern Screech owls that are enjoying a “vacation” from their cage while it is being cleaned.  They loved the view from the second story window where they could see the woodlot behind our hospital.  A few weeks later, these owls were moved into an outdoor cage in the woodlot, and once they acclimated to life outdoors they left the cage on their own accord to return to a life in the wild.

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
DSC_0976 (640x425) (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Catbird Cafe will be closed on Saturday, July 23. We will reopen on Saturday July 30 at 4:30 PM.