New England Wildlife Center
Preserving New England's Wild Legacy
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By: Katrina Bergman
turtlexraysept2012

This turtle spends hours of every day looking at his right front leg.  Why?

By: Katrina Bergman
coyote_better

Doing Great!

Hey all, wanted to give you an update on the Coyote we have in the hospital. This little guy has made a lot of progress since mid-August and his condition has improved dramatically. He is recovering from a severe case of Sarcoptic Mange as well as a bacterial infection and malnutrition.

This coyote teen has been receiving a regiment of antibiotics and anti-parasitic drugs as well as nutritional support to help him get back to a healthy weight. As you can see from the picture his mange has mostly cleared and the fur on his face is re-growing nicely. He is much more active and alert and has regained his appetite.

He will be receiving his 3rd round of treatments this week and we are cautiously optimistic that he will be healthy enough to return to the wild by the middle of October. Thank you all for your concern and we will keep you posted on his progress.

 

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
pigeonmosmay2012

 

 

A pigeon is admitted after being scooped from the Charles River near Cambridge. He had reportedly been caught by a hawk, who accidentally dropped him into the water below. Luckily a good Samaritan at the Museum of Science saw the incident and fished him out before it was too late. When he arrived he was suffering from several puncture wounds and was quite disoriented to his surroundings. After about a week of cage rest and antibiotics he is ready to rejoin his friends and family in the wild, with instructions to avoid making any more friends with large talons.
Dr. Mertz believes the culprit to be one of the Peregrine Falcons who have made a home on the MIT campus this past year. They are among the fastest animals in the world and have an affinity for catching small birds, after all they did not receive the nickname ”Pigeon Hawk” for nothing.

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
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By: Greg Mertz, DVM
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How grape vines frolic.  This is the underside of a wild fox grape vine.  These tendrils help fix the vine unto the ground or another surface if they touch it.  Until then they remain splayed and frolicsome.

Fox grapes are eaten by foxes, raccoons, squirrels, grackles, cedar waxwings, and me.

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
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This moth visited my house last evening.  He obliged me with a short photo session.

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
Ox-eyed daisy

Ox-eyed daisy

Wild Rose

By: Greg Mertz, DVM
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In spite of the rain and fog there is a lot happening on the trails and natural areas of our area.