New England Wildlife Center
Preserving New England's Wild Legacy
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By: Brodie Morris
sugar glider not winking

This little fellow is a sugar glider that recently visited us at Odd Pet Vet. Sugar gliders are marsupials native to Australia. They eat a wide variety of foods in the wild, including insects, fruits, and nectar. As their name suggests, they have the ability to glide through the air using the flaps between their limbs. They are very social animals, and usually live in groups of about 6 or 7 adults, along with their young.

sugar glider not winking

By: Brodie Morris
Hairy Woodpecker PL

This is a Hairy Woodpecker, a species of bird found throughout North America. They can often be found pecking at trees in order to find the wood-boring bugs that are their preferred food source. This little one was admitted to us because she was unable to walk and had a head tilt. Often in cases where birds are displaying neurologic symptoms the first thing we think of is that they hit something head on. Birds often strike windows while flying, because they see right through the glass and assume that they have a clear flight path. After a few days of rest and some anti-inflammatory medication however, she is doing much better, and should soon be ready to go back to the wild.

Hairy Woodpecker PL

By: Brodie Morris
Dr. Adamski

Our very own Dr. Rob Adamski has been asked to speak at the annual meeting of the IWRC, the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council. Dr. Adamski will be talking about a variety of subjects, including our recent involvement in research dealing with a new Polyomavirus found in raccoons. It should be a great opportunity to coordinate with some excellent wildlife rehabilitators.

Dr. Adamski

By: Brodie Morris
Oil Pigeon 2 PL

Our rock dove that was covered in oil is doing a lot better now. The washes have been very effective, and he’s about ready to be released. He seems a lot happier now that he’s clean!

Oil Pigeon 2 PL

By: Brodie Morris
Fluffy ornate box PL

This is Fluffy, an Ornate box turtle that recently came into Odd Pet Vet for a beak trim and helmet removal. He’s a male turtle, which we know due to the distinctive red color of his eyes. You can see the before and after here, it’s pretty interesting to see the difference. These are normal growths for a turtle in a gentle, captive environment, but it’s good to have them taken care of whenever they’re getting too large. We are now able to offer appointments seven day a week, so if you have an exotic pet that needs any treatment or attention feel free to give us a call! Our number is (781) 682-4878.

Fluffy ornate box PL

By: Brodie Morris
woodcock PL

This is an American woodcock, a species of bird that commonly lives in fields with tall grass or woods with plenty of shrubbery. This guy suffered head trauma after running into a window, which sadly happens a lot with woodcocks right before winter. Their migratory path takes them right through the city of Boston, and they often fail to avoid buildings in their way. He should be fine though, after a few days of medication and rest we will hopefully release him back to his migration.

woodcock PL

By: Brodie Morris
Oil Pigeon PL

This is a rock dove that we recently admitted to the Center. His feathers are coated in oil, which occasionally happens to animals living in urban environments. Right now he’s looking better than when he arrived, because we have started the process of getting the oil off. It involves daily baths with Dawn dish washing liquid, a very effective and safe cleaning agent for animals that have been coated with oil. It’s important to make sure that before you begin, the animal is in a stable condition. Taking multiple days and giving the animal the night to rest between treatments help make sure all the oil comes off, and also keeps the animal’s stress as low as possible.

Oil Pigeon PL

By: Brodie Morris
lillian birthday

This is Lillian Vega, and for her ninth birthday she requested that friends and family donate funds and supplies to NEWC to help us care for the wild animals in our hospital. It takes a very rare spirit of generosity to do what Lillian did, and whenever this happens for us it honestly amazes me. Thank you so much Lillian, your help is sorely needed with winter coming around, and the money and supplies you arranged for us to receive will be a very real help in our struggle to care for every animal we can with limited resources. You’re a truly generous and caring person, and we are incredibly grateful!

lillian birthday

By: Brodie Morris
thanks for the pumpkins

Thanks for the pumpkins Meribeth Abigail and Elizabeth! And thanks to everyone else who has donated so far, we really appreciate it! We’re still looking for more, as well as for people to help us carve or who can deliver carved pumpkins as of the 23rd. Hope to see everyone at Night of a Thousand Faces this weekend!

thanks for the pumpkins

By: Brodie Morris

Due to our Night of a Thousand Faces event this weekend we will not be having our regularly scheduled Catbird Cafe on Saturday the 25th.

By: Brodie Morris
quinlan birthday

Today’s post is a heartfelt thank you to Quinlan Connors, who you can see on the right in this photo holding the bag of dog food. Quinlan had his 9th birthday recently, and instead of asking for presents of any kind for himself he arranged for all of his guests to bring donations and supplies to us at NEWC. We received a huge amount of much needed food, cleaning supplies, and other essential items that we need to keep running. We are nearing winter, and we are going to be getting more and more animals suffering from exposure and lack of food. This kind of large donation is absolutely incredible for us, and really helps us to keep the animals we rescue healthy and well cared for. Thank you very much Quinlan, you’re amazing!

quinlan birthday

By: Brodie Morris
NEWC Handout

NEWC Handout

By: Brodie Morris
Yellow bellied sapsucker

This is a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker which was just released recently from NEWC. One of many species of woodpeckers, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers will drill holes in trees by repeatedly tapping with their beaks in order to consume the sugary sap inside.They live mostly on the eastern side of North America, migrating down to the tip of Mexico in the winter and up to the middle reaches of Canada in the summer. You can tell one of these birds has been around by the neat row of holes, called sapwells, that they leave in the trees they feed in.

Yellow bellied sapsucker

By: Brodie Morris
Kyle

Today I want to say a huge, huge thank you to Kyle Sweeney, who recently had his 14th birthday. Instead of asking for gifts, he instead requested that his guests and relatives bring money and supplies to donate to the wildlife center. He raised over 200 dollars for us, as well as tons of supplies that are much needed for the daily upkeep of the Center. It’s because of people like him that we can keep treating New England’s wildlife. Thank you so much Kyle, it was really the act of an amazingly generous person.

Kyle

By: Brodie Morris
waffle pumpkin

Hey everyone! As you know we’re getting ready for our very exciting Night Of A Thousand Faces event, and we’re looking for pumpkins! If anyone could donate some that would be amazing. We’re looking to start collecting them on the 14th so that they don’t go bad before the weekend of the event, so if anyone could bring us any pumpkins on or after the 14th that would be absolutely awesome!

Also, if anyone wants to come join us for carving we’re going to start on the 21st so the pumpkins stay completely good for the nights we need them. We will be having a great time practicing our carving skills, and we welcome anyone who wants to join in!

Waffle is leading up the pumpkin collection, and he’s very concerned that this might be our only pumpkin.

waffle pumpkin

By: Brodie Morris
red shouldered release pic

This is a red-shouldered hawk that came to us after being hit by a car. Fortunately, it was a glancing blow, and once he was given some time to recover in a dark and quiet place he was ready to be released again. Here you can see Dr. Mertz sending him back off to the wild!

red shouldered release pic

By: Brodie Morris
fundraiser flyer

Hey everyone, I wanted to let you know that the amazing writer and journalist Sandra Lee is organizing an awesome fundraiser for the New England Wildlife Center. It’s $50 a ticket, and will include excellent food, a silent auction, music, dancing, and words from keynote speakers Dr. Greg Mertz and State Representative Bruce J. Ayers. It’s happening Thursday October 23rd from 7-11 pm at the Waterclub at Marina Bay in Quincy MA. Here’s a link to the site:

http://www.sandraleebooks.com/a-walk-on-the-wild-side.html

A walk on the wild side fundraiser flyer

By: Brodie Morris
Raccoon 1 Liberation Day Useable

This weekend was very exciting for us, as we got to send all of our orphaned raccoons back into the wild with rabies vaccinations and our best wishes. Here we have some pictures documenting the endeavor.

Raccoon 1 Liberation Day Useable

Here the raccoons are investigating the source of all the noise, as our team of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and interns got ready to go in. It’s liberation day!

Raccoon 2 Let Me Out Useable

This little guy was particularly interested, he looks like he’s saying “it’s time for me to go!”

Raccoon 3 Raccoon Nation Roundup Useable

Here’s the start of Raccoon Nation roundup. Our team started out heading in to grab the raccoons one at a time.

Raccoon 4 Vaccination Useable

Once we had one, they got their rabies vaccine to make sure that they wouldn’t be at risk themselves or pose a danger to the public after their release. After they were given the shot, they were immediately put into large carrying cases so that they could be transported out to a more remote forested region. There they were released together, and we wish them all the best!

By: Brodie Morris
cub scout tour

We were recently visited by a local group of Weymouth Cub Scouts coming for a guided tour around NEWC. They were awesome, very inquisitive, and incredibly interested in the animals and environmentally friendly technology at the Center. Here you can see Zak Mertz leading the educational tour. It was a pleasure to have them with us, and hopefully they’ll be back soon!

cub scout tour

By: Brodie Morris
Night of a Thousand Faces workable

It’s almost time for our yearly Night Of A Thousand Faces event! On October 24th and 25th at NEWC there will be music, refreshments, animals, and of course both the beautifully illuminated pumpkin trail and the very spooky haunted trail. It will be incredibly fun for the whole family, and we hope to see you there!

Night of a Thousand Faces workable

By: Brodie Morris
Bearded

This is a bearded dragon that came through Odd Pet Vet recently for a routine exam. Bearded dragons are native to Australia, and did not become popular pets in the United States until the mid 1990’s. When they get excited or scared, it’s common for their lower head and neck region to turn black, which can be intimidating to someone unfamiliar with the effect. They generally eat a combination of insects, fruit, and vegetables in the wild. This little guy is doing great, and got an all-clear on his exam.

Bearded

By: Brodie Morris
Hull faire

Thanks to everyone who stopped by our table at Hull’s Endless Summer Waterfront Festival! We had a great time talking to people about who we are and about the educational animals that came with us. Falco in particular was very popular, and he was having a great time being out for a windy day by the beach. We hope to be there again next year!

Hull faire

By: Brodie Morris
hummingbird

This is an orphaned Ruby-throated Hummingbird that came to us awhile back weak and unable to fly. We have been caring for her as she grows older and stronger, and she will hopefully be ready for release soon. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are the only hummingbirds found in Massachusetts. The males have a distinctive red patch of color on their throats, which gives the species its name. Their wings beat incredibly quickly while they fly, at an average speed of roughly 53 beats per minute.

hummingbird

By: Brodie Morris
vicki

This is a photo with (from left to right) Martha Smith, vice president of animal welfare at Animal Rescue League, Katrina Bergman, our Executive director, Dr. Greg Mertz, our CEO, and New York Times best-selling author of the book “Elephant Company” Vicki Croke. Both long-time friends of the Center, Ms. Smith and Ms. Croke were at a reception with Greg and Katrina recently held at the JFK Library in Boston, celebrating the release and success of her latest book. “Elephant Company” is the story of a man’s amazing connection with the elephants of Burma, and how together they managed to become heroes during World War II. If you’re interested in finding yourself a copy, here is a link to its amazon page.

http://www.amazon.com/Elephant-Company-Inspiring-Unlikely-Animals/dp/1400069335

vicki