New England Wildlife Center
Preserving New England's Wild Legacy
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
Be a Hero! Become a monthly donor today.
By: Brodie Morris
Red Shouldered Hawk Before and After PL

In these photos you can see the change from when she first arrived at NEWC to today. When she first came in she was lethargic, unable to eat, and had serious head trauma, in addition to an assortment of smaller wounds. Her treatment has been primarily anti-inflammatory medication, basic wound-care, nutritional support, and regular fluid administration. She’s already doing much better, and should hopefully be fine for release in the near future.

Red Shouldered Hawk Before and After PL

By: Brodie Morris
liver infection

This is a Leopard Gecko that came into Odd Pet Vet recently suffering from a liver infection. This is an interesting case because Dr. Mertz could actually see the white spots caused by the infection through the Gecko’s belly, as you can see in this photo. Generally these would be hidden by an animal’s opaque skin, but in this case the Leopard Gecko’s transparent belly was helpful for the diagnosis. He was proscribed antibiotics, and should be feeling better soon.

 

liver infection

By: Brodie Morris
Eastern Screech Owl

This is an Eastern Screech-Owl that came to us recently with an injured wing. He’ll be with us for awhile with his wing in a cast while it heals. Eastern Screech-Owls, like most other species of owl, are nocturnal. They have both brownish-red and gray colormorphs, and they can be found in wooded areas throughout the eastern United States. Their diet consists of pretty much any small animal that they can catch, including a large number of invertebrates such as frogs, beetles, and earthworms.

 

Eastern Screech Owl

By: Brodie Morris
lizard

This is a black and white tegu owned by one of the volunteers at NEWC. Black and white tegus are omnivores native to South America. They are exceptionally intelligent reptiles, and are fairly common pets due to their relaxed natures and their tendency to form fairly strong attachments to their owners. Fully grown males can reach almost 5 feet in length from nose to tail tip, significantly longer than the females, which generally only reach a maximum length of about 3 feet.

 

lizard

By: Brodie Morris
mustache bearded dragon

The Odd Pet Vet can now see patients 7 days a week. :) If your exotic family member needs veterinary care, please call us at 781 682 4878. 100% of all veterinary fees support the New England Wildlife Center’s care of wildlife and education outreach. Remember, if you need boarding for your bird, rat, snake, dragon or other exotic pet, we are your best bet! Reasonable prices from docs that care. New England Wildlife Center – it’s fun in here.

mustache bearded dragon

By: Brodie Morris
Hawk Intubation

This is an example of one of the procedures we do fairly regularly at NEWC, tracheal intubation. We use this when we need an animal to be unconscious, for example if we are going to be performing surgery. In this case, we were doing a wound debridement on a red tailed hawk’s foot, which means that we were cleaning out a dirty wound. Tracheal intubation involves feeding a clean, plastic tube down the animal’s trachea. Oxygen and Isoflurane, our surgical anesthetic, are then supplied down the tube and shot almost directly to the animal’s lungs. This ensures that the animal has a steady flow of oxygen during the procedure, as well as a specific and controlled amount of anesthetic, and prevents anything from clogging their airway.
Hawk Intubation

By: Brodie Morris
Field Mouse Useable PL

This is a young meadow vole that we have been treating at NEWC for awhile now. He came to us malnourished and dehydrated, but is doing great now and should be ready for release soon. Meadow voles, sometimes also called field mice, can be found throughout the northern half of North America. They are active year round, and are commonly seen both at night and during the day, without a set activity period. They prefer wet, grassy areas for habitat, and will eat mostly grass, leaves, flowers, and fruits.

Field Mouse Useable PL

By: Brodie Morris
little brown bat PL

This is a big brown bat, native to most of North America, Central America, and the far north of South America. He came in malnourished and with a bit of an infection about a week ago. Big brown bats are insectivores, catching prey such as moths, wasps, and mosquitoes while in flight. They are mostly active at night, and hunt using echolocation. This means that they emit a high frequency sound, and then interpret their surroundings based on how the sound bounces back to them off of objects. This guy is responding well to medication, and should soon be completely healthy.

little brown bat PL

By: Brodie Morris
sugar glider not winking

This little fellow is a sugar glider that recently visited us at Odd Pet Vet. Sugar gliders are marsupials native to Australia. They eat a wide variety of foods in the wild, including insects, fruits, and nectar. As their name suggests, they have the ability to glide through the air using the flaps between their limbs. They are very social animals, and usually live in groups of about 6 or 7 adults, along with their young.

sugar glider not winking

By: Brodie Morris
Hairy Woodpecker PL

This is a Hairy Woodpecker, a species of bird found throughout North America. They can often be found pecking at trees in order to find the wood-boring bugs that are their preferred food source. This little one was admitted to us because she was unable to walk and had a head tilt. Often in cases where birds are displaying neurologic symptoms the first thing we think of is that they hit something head on. Birds often strike windows while flying, because they see right through the glass and assume that they have a clear flight path. After a few days of rest and some anti-inflammatory medication however, she is doing much better, and should soon be ready to go back to the wild.

Hairy Woodpecker PL

By: Brodie Morris
Dr. Adamski

Our very own Dr. Rob Adamski has been asked to speak at the annual meeting of the IWRC, the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council. Dr. Adamski will be talking about a variety of subjects, including our recent involvement in research dealing with a new Polyomavirus found in raccoons. It should be a great opportunity to coordinate with some excellent wildlife rehabilitators.

Dr. Adamski

By: Brodie Morris
Oil Pigeon 2 PL

Our rock dove that was covered in oil is doing a lot better now. The washes have been very effective, and he’s about ready to be released. He seems a lot happier now that he’s clean!

Oil Pigeon 2 PL

By: Brodie Morris
Fluffy ornate box PL

This is Fluffy, an Ornate box turtle that recently came into Odd Pet Vet for a beak trim and helmet removal. He’s a male turtle, which we know due to the distinctive red color of his eyes. You can see the before and after here, it’s pretty interesting to see the difference. These are normal growths for a turtle in a gentle, captive environment, but it’s good to have them taken care of whenever they’re getting too large. We are now able to offer appointments seven day a week, so if you have an exotic pet that needs any treatment or attention feel free to give us a call! Our number is (781) 682-4878.

Fluffy ornate box PL

By: Brodie Morris
woodcock PL

This is an American woodcock, a species of bird that commonly lives in fields with tall grass or woods with plenty of shrubbery. This guy suffered head trauma after running into a window, which sadly happens a lot with woodcocks right before winter. Their migratory path takes them right through the city of Boston, and they often fail to avoid buildings in their way. He should be fine though, after a few days of medication and rest we will hopefully release him back to his migration.

woodcock PL

By: Brodie Morris
Oil Pigeon PL

This is a rock dove that we recently admitted to the Center. His feathers are coated in oil, which occasionally happens to animals living in urban environments. Right now he’s looking better than when he arrived, because we have started the process of getting the oil off. It involves daily baths with Dawn dish washing liquid, a very effective and safe cleaning agent for animals that have been coated with oil. It’s important to make sure that before you begin, the animal is in a stable condition. Taking multiple days and giving the animal the night to rest between treatments help make sure all the oil comes off, and also keeps the animal’s stress as low as possible.

Oil Pigeon PL

By: Brodie Morris
lillian birthday

This is Lillian Vega, and for her ninth birthday she requested that friends and family donate funds and supplies to NEWC to help us care for the wild animals in our hospital. It takes a very rare spirit of generosity to do what Lillian did, and whenever this happens for us it honestly amazes me. Thank you so much Lillian, your help is sorely needed with winter coming around, and the money and supplies you arranged for us to receive will be a very real help in our struggle to care for every animal we can with limited resources. You’re a truly generous and caring person, and we are incredibly grateful!

lillian birthday

By: Brodie Morris
thanks for the pumpkins

Thanks for the pumpkins Meribeth Abigail and Elizabeth! And thanks to everyone else who has donated so far, we really appreciate it! We’re still looking for more, as well as for people to help us carve or who can deliver carved pumpkins as of the 23rd. Hope to see everyone at Night of a Thousand Faces this weekend!

thanks for the pumpkins

By: Brodie Morris

Due to our Night of a Thousand Faces event this weekend we will not be having our regularly scheduled Catbird Cafe on Saturday the 25th.

By: Brodie Morris
quinlan birthday

Today’s post is a heartfelt thank you to Quinlan Connors, who you can see on the right in this photo holding the bag of dog food. Quinlan had his 9th birthday recently, and instead of asking for presents of any kind for himself he arranged for all of his guests to bring donations and supplies to us at NEWC. We received a huge amount of much needed food, cleaning supplies, and other essential items that we need to keep running. We are nearing winter, and we are going to be getting more and more animals suffering from exposure and lack of food. This kind of large donation is absolutely incredible for us, and really helps us to keep the animals we rescue healthy and well cared for. Thank you very much Quinlan, you’re amazing!

quinlan birthday

By: Brodie Morris
NEWC Handout

NEWC Handout

By: Brodie Morris
Yellow bellied sapsucker

This is a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker which was just released recently from NEWC. One of many species of woodpeckers, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers will drill holes in trees by repeatedly tapping with their beaks in order to consume the sugary sap inside.They live mostly on the eastern side of North America, migrating down to the tip of Mexico in the winter and up to the middle reaches of Canada in the summer. You can tell one of these birds has been around by the neat row of holes, called sapwells, that they leave in the trees they feed in.

Yellow bellied sapsucker

By: Brodie Morris
Kyle

Today I want to say a huge, huge thank you to Kyle Sweeney, who recently had his 14th birthday. Instead of asking for gifts, he instead requested that his guests and relatives bring money and supplies to donate to the wildlife center. He raised over 200 dollars for us, as well as tons of supplies that are much needed for the daily upkeep of the Center. It’s because of people like him that we can keep treating New England’s wildlife. Thank you so much Kyle, it was really the act of an amazingly generous person.

Kyle

By: Brodie Morris
waffle pumpkin

Hey everyone! As you know we’re getting ready for our very exciting Night Of A Thousand Faces event, and we’re looking for pumpkins! If anyone could donate some that would be amazing. We’re looking to start collecting them on the 14th so that they don’t go bad before the weekend of the event, so if anyone could bring us any pumpkins on or after the 14th that would be absolutely awesome!

Also, if anyone wants to come join us for carving we’re going to start on the 21st so the pumpkins stay completely good for the nights we need them. We will be having a great time practicing our carving skills, and we welcome anyone who wants to join in!

Waffle is leading up the pumpkin collection, and he’s very concerned that this might be our only pumpkin.

waffle pumpkin

By: Brodie Morris
red shouldered release pic

This is a red-shouldered hawk that came to us after being hit by a car. Fortunately, it was a glancing blow, and once he was given some time to recover in a dark and quiet place he was ready to be released again. Here you can see Dr. Mertz sending him back off to the wild!

red shouldered release pic